Friday, 29 April 2016 06:09

2016 Federal Budget - A Preview

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Westpac expects the underlying budget deficit for 2016/17 which will be announced by the Federal Government on Budget night, May 3, will be $29bn. That is a near $5bn upgrade from the Government's December forecast, published in the Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook (MYEFO). Across the four years to 2018/19, the improvement is $17bn.

The economic environment is somewhat more favourable than anticipated. Real output growth has surprised to the high side in 2015/16. Commodity prices have also surprised, bouncing off historic lows, driving an upgrade of the terms of trade forecasts. In 2016/17 the terms of trade is set to swing from a major negative for national income to a small positive. Partially offsetting this: the currency has moved up from its lows; and general inflation pressures have weakened.

On the Government's forecasts for real GDP growth we expect just the one change, a 0.25% upgrade for 2015/16. That yields a profile of: 3.0%, 2.75%, 3.0% and 3.0%. The forecast for nominal GDP growth is upgraded by 0.25% in both 2015/16 and 2016/17 but downgraded by 0.25% in 2017/18, giving a profile of: 3.0%, 4.75%, 4.75% and 5.25%.

The iron ore price is expected to be revised higher from US$39/t fob in MYEFO to US$50/t (fob) for 2016/17 and US$46/t (fob) beyond that. This adds an estimated $7.8bn over the 3 years to 2018/19.

The budget impact from the improved economic backdrop, together with prospects for the 2015/16 deficit to be $1bn smaller than expected on lower expenditures, is $4.5bn in 2016/17 and $3bn a year thereafter, we estimate.

We anticipate that the balance of new policy measures, including the drawing down of the contingency reserve, as occurred in the May 2015 Budget, will be neutral for the budget in 2016/17 and improve the budget position by $2bn in 2017/18, increasing to a $5bn contribution in 2018/19.

The 2016 Budget is to focus on competition, innovation, investment and infrastructure. There will be tax cuts to boost investment and activity, as occurred in the 2015 Budget, funded by revenue integrity measures. A new infrastructure delivery agency is to be created, with private sector involvement. Any potential impact of the new infrastructure agency on government borrowing is unclear and has not been incorporated in our figuring.

The budget returns to balance in 2019/20, which now rolls into the four year forward estimate period. That is one year earlier than expected in MYEFO.

Net debt peaks at 17.9% of GDP in 2017/18, which is below the 18.5% peak forecast in MYEFO. In dollar terms, net debt climbs to $330bn in 2018/19, some $17bn below that in MYEFO.

 

 

Bill Evans

Westpac Economics

 

 

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